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The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government

 
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What Can Prevent the Next Corporate Meltdown?
Jerome Green Hall, Room 106, Columbia Law School Campus, 435 W 116th St, New York
Tuesday, June 6, 2017
5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

2013 Forums and Events

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The Future of Affirmative Action


Co-Sponsored by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government and the SUNY Levin Institute

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Should race be used as a factor in college admissions? Should applicants’ socioeconomic background be considered instead? Are conventional measures of academic merit really the best way to judge the potential of applicants to selective colleges?

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government and the SUNY Levin Institute hosted a moderated conversation about the past, present, and future of affirmative action with three leading public intellectuals.

The discussion featured:

  • Harvard Law School Professor Randall Kennedy, author of the newly released book For Discrimination: Race, Affirmative Action, and the Law;
  • Century Foundation Senior Fellow Richard Kahlenberg, whose books include The Remedy: Class, Race, and Affirmative Action.

The Forum was moderated by Columbia University Journalism Professor and New Yorker Staff Writer Nicholas Lemann, who has written extensively on education and race in articles and books that include The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy and The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America.

Debate over these questions has intensified in the wake of the Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, which narrowly upheld the university’s affirmative action policies, but called into question whether those policies can survive future scrutiny. The topic is more timely than ever as the Court weighs yet another precedent-setting case — a challenge to Michigan’s 2006 voter referendum banning race-conscious admissions.

Video


Open Health Data Workshop Open Health Data Workshop Open Health Data Workshop

Open Health Data, Open Opportunities Workshop


Co-Sponsored by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government and the New York State Health Foundation
Friday, November 22, 2013

How can releasing millions of data points improve the health of New Yorkers? This interactive workshop brought together researchers and practitioners to explore how open health data can be a viable new resource for health research and developing innovative health interventions.

The workshop introduced public health researchers from across the state to newly available open health data resources. In addition, participants provided input to the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) on what kinds of data for research are in demand.

Specific objectives of the workshop were to:
  • Promote academic research on health issues confronting New York State by providing researchers with information about how to access and navigate the state’s open data portals;
  • Provide the NYSDOH and other policy leaders with feedback on the usability of the state’s open health data for research purposes;
  • Facilitate networking among health researchers and practitioners in New York State; and
  • Further develop a community of health policy scholars among State University of New York campuses.
Workshop Website

Chris Swecker

Detecting and Preventing Fraud, Waste and Abuse: A Statewide and National Perspective


Co-Sponsored by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government and the University at Albany's Center for Technology in Government. Wednesday, November 6, 2013


Nearly every day, the newspapers are filled with stories of fraud, waste and abuse involving government programs and systems here in New York State and throughout the United States.

Consider these annual statistics...

  • The IRS estimates that federal income taxes are underpaid by nearly 17 percent;
  • The Department of Health and Human Service indicates a 7.1 percent Medicaid error rate, exposing billions of dollars in losses; and
  • The U.S. Department of Labor estimates just over 6.6 percent of Unemployment Insurance (UI) claims are improper.
  • Collectively, this abuse costs New York State taxpayers billions of dollars — minimally — each year and impacts the ability of the government to provide resources to those who need them most. To combat these trends, governments are revisiting the way they address fraud, waste and abuse and are implementing new technologies to tackle the issue from an enterprise perspective.

This forum delved into these topics, both from a state and national perspective. Featured panelists included:

  • Senator Marty Golden, sponsor of enterprise fraud program office bill (A6988/S4815)
  • Assemblyman Andrew Hevesi, sponsor of enterprise fraud program office bill (A6988/S4815)
  • Paul Mahoney, New York State Office of the Attorney General
  • Pete Grannis, New York State Office of State Comptroller
  • Theresa Pardo, Center for Technology in Government at the University at Albany
  • Chris Swecker, Fraud Consultant and Former Assistant Director of the FBI
  • Shaun Barry, Principal, Fraud and Financial Crimes Global Practice at SAS
  • Dan Chan, CIO, Finance, Regulation and Gaming Cluster, Office of Information Technology Services (OITS)

Audio
Video

Presentations
Chris Swecker's PowerPoint
Theresa Pardo's PowerPoint
Shaun Barry's PowerPoint
Paul Mahoney's PowerPoint

Handouts
Don’t Get Burned: Fraud Detection and Prevention for the Not-for-Profit Sector
An Enterprise Approach to Fraud Detection and Prevention in Government Programs
Using Analytics to Uncover Claims Errors and Fraud


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Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers


Co-Sponsored by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government and the University at Buffalo's Clinical and Translational Research Center.

Friday, October 25, 2013

A panel discussion on the link between higher education and economic development. Western New York's academic leaders shared how their institutions contribute to economic vitality, and learn what business executives value in these collaborations. Authors D. Bruce Johnstone and Jason Lane discussed what they found when writing their new book: Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers.

Moderator: Grove Potter, Executive Business Editor, The Buffalo News

Panelists:

  • Dr. Howard Cohen, Interim President, Buffalo State College
  • Dr. Charles Edmondson, President, Alfred University
  • Dottie Gallagher-Cohen, President and CEO, Buffalo Niagara Partnership
  • Dr. Virginia Schaefer Horvath, President, SUNY Fredonia
  • Jack Quinn, President, Erie Community College
  • Dr. Satish K. Tripathi, President, University at Buffalo
  • Howard Zemsky, Co-chair, WNY Regional Economic Development Council
Remarks:

  • D. Bruce Johnstone, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, UB; former SUNY Chancellor
  • Jason E. Lane, Deputy Director for Research, Rockefeller Institute of Government


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Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers: Building the North Country’s Innovation Economy Through Technology Commercialization & New Business Start-Ups


Co-Sponsored by the North Country Regional Economic Development Council, the Nelson Rockefeller Institute for Government, the Association of Public Broadcasters, CITEC, and the HEARD Consortium

Monday, October 7, 2013

Recent policy debates underscore the role of higher education in the economic vitality of our states and nation. Through cultivation of a rigorous teaching, learning, and research environment; workforce development; creativity and innovation; knowledge transfer; and community engagement, these institutions produce prospective employees, assist regional businesses, promote the commercialization of new products and service development, attract new industries, and enhance quality of life. We invite you to learn more about the ways in which the colleges, universities and research institutes across the region contribute to the economic renaissance of the North Country.

Jason E. Lane, Ph.D., editor of the new book, Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers, and deputy director of research at the Rockefeller Institute for Government, joined regional leaders in business, government and higher education.

Their collective insights revealed the ways in which small business, the service sector and industry leaders benefit from the economic contributions of the region’s many colleges and universities. It is our intention that this dialogue further spurs workforce development opportunities, entrepreneurial creativity and technology innovation across the region.

Presentations
Jason Lane's PowerPoint


John Sipple

School District Fiscal Stress


Co-Sponsored by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government and the New York State Association of School Business Officials (NYSASBO)

Friday, October 4, 2013

This forum considered the effects of fiscal stress on New York’s school districts. The panelists who discussed the extent of the crisis facing our schools districts and how we must work to control it include:

  • Deborah Cunningham, NYSASBO Director of Education and Research
  • E.J. McMahon, President and Founder, Empire Center for Public Policy, Inc.;
  • Michael Rebell, Executive Director, Campaign for Educational Equity, Teachers College, Columbia University; and
  • Rick Timbs, Executive Director, Statewide School Finance Consortium

Keynote speaker John Sipple, Director of the NYS Center for Rural Schools, considered the question: Will New York’s students become the victims of educational insolvency?

Summary
Audio
Video (provided by NYSASBO)

Presentations
John Sipple's PowerPoint
Deborah Cunningham's PowerPoint
E.J. McMahon's PowerPoint
Rick Timbs' PowerPoint

Handout
Safeguarding Students’ Rights to A Sound Basic Education

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Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers


Co-Sponsored by the University at Albany, The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government, and the Center for Economic Growth.

Friday, September 27, 2013

Recent policy debates have highlighted the role that higher education plays in the economic vitality of our states and nation. Through their roles in teaching and learning, workforce development, innovation, knowledge transfer, and community engagement, these institutions help produce prospective employees, assist regional businesses, promote new product and service development, attract new industries and enhance quality of life. We invite you to a dynamic breakfast discussion to learn more about the ways in which the more than two dozen colleges and universities in the Capital District contribute to the economic vitality of the region.

Jason E. Lane, Ph.D., editor of the new book Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers began the event with a discussion of his book.

His presentation was followed by a panel discussion moderated by New York NOW host Matt Ryan featuring:

  • Quintin B. Bullock, D.D.S., President, Schenectady County Community College
  • Robert J. Jones, Ph.D., President, University at Albany
  • Andrew J. Matonak, Ed.D., President, Hudson Valley Community College
  • Laura W. Schweitzer, Ph.D., President, Union Graduate College
  • F. Michael Tucker, President & CEO, Center for Economic Growth.
Their collective insights revealed the ways in which local business and industry leaders benefit from the economic contributions of the region's many colleges and universities. It is our hope that the presentation and subsequent panel discussion might assist you in better understanding the possibilities inherent within our public and private institutions of higher learning.

Presentations
Jason Lane's PowerPoint


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Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers: How Two Colleges Have Helped Plattsburgh Become Montreal’s US Suburb


Co-Sponsored by the North Country Regional Economic Development Council, the Nelson Rockefeller Institute for Government, the Association of Public Broadcasters, CITEC, and the HEARD Consortium

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Recent policy debates underscore the role of higher education in the economic vitality of our states and nation. Through cultivation of a rigorous teaching, learning, and research environment; workforce development; creativity and innovation; knowledge transfer; and community engagement, these institutions produce prospective employees, assist regional businesses, promote the commercialization of new products and service development, attract new industries, and enhance quality of life. We invite you to learn more about the ways in which the colleges, universities and research institutes across the region contribute to the economic renaissance of the North Country.

Jason E. Lane, Ph.D., editor of the new book, Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers, and deputy director of research at the Rockefeller Institute for Government, joined regional leaders in business, government and higher education.

Their collective insights revealed the ways in which small business, the service sector and industry leaders benefit from the economic contributions of the region’s many colleges and universities. It is our intention that this dialogue further spurs workforce development opportunities, entrepreneurial creativity and technology innovation across the region.

Summary
Video (posted by Mountain Lake PBS)

Presentations
Jason Lane's PowerPoint


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The Fiscal Crisis Facing Local Governments: The National Perspective


Co-Sponsored by the New York Conference of Mayors, the New York State Association of Counties, and the Association of Towns of the State of New York.

April 11, 2013

Lt. Gov. Ravitch discusses local government fiscal distress from a state and federal perspective.

Summary
Audio
Video


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The Fiscal Crisis Facing New York’s Local Governments


Co-sponsored by the New York Conference of Mayors, the New York State Association of Counties, and the Association of Towns of the State of New York

April 8, 2013

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli has issued a series of major reports on the budgetary pressures facing localities across New York State. The comptroller assesses the current condition of local governments in the Empire State and offers his outlook on what lies ahead.

Summary
Audio
Video

Handouts:
Local Government Snapshot, January 2013
Comptroller DiNapoli's Remarks